Friday night we had a standing appointment with our vet and after that we’d be taking Henry home (about 27 hours after surgery). First off, I’d like to update you about the vet, Henry’s prognosis, etc. Then I’ll include pictures – yes, they are graphic. I will warn you before if you don’t want to keep scrolling.

So you can get an idea of how large the lump on Henry’s rump is/was, here is a picture. He’s kind of a wiggle worm, so this was the best picture I could get.

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We got to our vet appointment and this is what we were told: The largest mass (on his right rump area) was basically a fat capsule. It will probably continue to grow. We asked what would cause it and our vet said that sometimes certain dogs can have parts of their DNA kind of turn on like a switch and cause an over-production of some things; like fat. He’s surprised that this happened to Henry since he’s not really a fat dog already. During the surgery, our vet discovered that it is intrusive – meaning it has many fingers reaching out and grabbing onto things. One of its fingers is nestling on Henry’s sciatic nerve. Our vet, not wanting to cripple Henry, left it alone. We were originally told that he removed the top half of it. I’m assuming there was some miscommunication there because our vet decided to not remove any of it. His reason being that it can “kind of upset the Gods” and make things worse. I asked him if there was going to be a time in our future where Henry would have to have an amputation. He didn’t say no, but he assured us that Henry can get around for a good while with this. He said that Henry will most likely be using his back leg as a kickstand when he’s older. He’ll kind of secure it up when he’s running, but when he’s standing it’ll act is a kickstand. Though, an amputation could happen, he’d like to avoid that at all costs.

Regarding the smaller lumps on the lower thigh, he removed the lump itself, the skin it was attached to, as well as the connective tissue underneath that rests on the muscle. He wants to really make sure that this will never come back. He’s not sure how it came back in the first place. Because he had to remove the connective tissue, this will result in a lot more pain than he wanted for Henry, but he needed to be thorough. We spent and extra $80 to have this sent off for testing to once again make sure it isn’t cancerous.

Now regarding the kidney/bladder stones, they were actually bladder stones. (Staff kept saying both kidney stones and bladder stones.) Once he stapled Henry up on the rump and thigh, he flipped him on his back and made an incision to the lower abdomen to retrieve the bladder stones. Once he got in there, he discovered that they weren’t there any longer. This is frustrating because it’s another incision to bother him. Our vet also discovered that Henry has an incredibly wide urethra for a dog and that Henry most likely passed the stones with no problem. (He seriously said that if he were to write in a medical journal about Henry that no one would believe it was all about the same dog – poor guy.) To avoid future stones, Henry will permanently be on a special urinary tract vet food.

Shortly before we were leaving, the rest results came in regarding his allergies.
For allergy tests, if the score is between 2 and 6, then action needs to be taken.

Henry is allergic to:
Short ragweed – score 3
Mugwort – score 1
Russian thistle – score 2
Rough pigweed – score 3
Giant ragweed – score 4
Yellow dock – score 1
Maple (tree) – score 4
Willow (tree) – score 1
Red top (grass) – score 2
Orchard (grass) – score 3
June (grass) – score 2
Cat dander – score 2
Sheep wool – score 2
Human dander – score 2
D. pteronyssinus (dust mites) – score 1
D. farinae (dust mites) – score 2
Aspergillus (mold) – score 2
Cladosporium (mold) – score 4
Mucor (mold) – score 3

Once Henry has healed from this surgery, he will undergo allergy shots to help him out with this. They’ll take the top 12 offenders from the list to decide on what goes in the allergy shots. We live in the woods, so the botanical molds, grasses, and trees don’t help him one bit. We recently purchased THIS air purifier to help clean these things from the air in our home – it doesn’t help that the air conditioner is pulling them in. We’re vaccuming more often to help with the cat and human dander as well. Hopefully this will cut down on any reactions and help prevent his thigh lumps from coming back.

Life at home post-op is hard. And I mean, like this is the hardest. He is so miserable. He was sent home with pain meds and half the time they don’t cut it at all. We have been by his side the entire time he’s been home cleaning his drain and assisting him in laying down and getting up. Every 5-6 hours we’re putting a hot compress on the stapled area near his drain – we were told to do this to help any fluids drain out better. When the pain medicine has worn off and he’s not able to have another dose yet, we do another compress and this seems to really help with his pain. He’s also restless and cries constantly because he’s so uncomfortable. This has basically resulted in us getting very little sleep. This Friday, the 1st, he’ll he going in for an assessment of the drain site and hopefully they’ll remove the drain. The next Friday, the 8th, is when he’ll hopefully get his staples removed. On his thigh, there are 25 staples. On the upper rump area, there are 18 staples. We can’t really get a great look at his lower abdomen staples, but we estimate that there are about 12 or so. This is a lot of staples. We’ve had him for only a couple nights at this point, but it seems like it has been a week.

I’d like to thank everyone for their questions in asking about him, as well as the thoughts & prayers.

Below I’ll be posting the graphic pictures, so if you don’t want to see them, then please don’t scroll down. These pictures are merely for me to gauge the progress of the incisions as well as for future reference if/when the lump come back a couple years from now – I can always make a quick search and refresh my brain what was said.

Here the pictures:

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(Click on any picture to enlarge.)

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Henry gets the chills when he has a compress on. We got some safety blankets for Christmas last year, so we grabbed one really quickly. It helps keep the heat in for his compress.

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