Okay, I just wanted to write a quick post updating you all on Henry and his recovery.

On Friday, August 8th, Henry had 55 staples removed. Our vet decided that he wanted to keep a few of them in the area where Henry’s skin began to pull apart at the thigh incision. Everything went well.

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Kind of blurry, but Henry actually really loves the vet. He loves all of the staff and they all really like him too. Our vet even commented how Henry is probably one of the most compliant dogs he’s ever come across. (Both him and Charlie are, really.)

On Monday, August 11th, Henry had his final 8 staples removed from the thigh incision.

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At this point I think he was just kinda done. Like, he just wants the cone off.

Annnd, he got his wish! Sort of…

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Our vet advised us that Henry will probably still need his cone for a couple days because he’ll most likely try to lick the thigh incision. Not 1 minute after saying that, Henry was making out with the incision.

Since then, he has gotten a little freedom and the cone is off when we’re home with him. When we’re gone, the cone goes back on. With just that little amount of freedom, Henry was able to lick his incision a little bit (because he’s super sneaky) and we discovered it was fairly pinkish red on Saturday morning. Henry is back on an antibiotic and his cone is on about 90% of the time. The incision is very dry and almost scaly, so our vet told us to buy some lansinoh cream and put on the incision. We’re hoping that this will really moisturize the skin and hopefully when this round of antibiotics is done, he won’t want to lick the incision. We’re not sure if he wants to lick it because it’s itchy or if it’s because he couldn’t for so long. Time will tell.

Also, I wanted to mention that we’ll be getting some halfway decent internet and hopefully I’ll be able to post more blogs from home and not from my phone.

P.S. For anyone interested in what Henry’s thigh incision was (the scientific name), it is a fibroadnexal dysplasia. It is a “slowly growing non-neoplastic lesion of the skin that is thought to be a result from dysregulation in healing. It is cured by a complete removal.” We’re not sure if the trauma from this surgery will make it come back though.

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